Nora's Playhouse

Posted by in Announcements

Since Nora’s Playhouse’s founding in 2009, we have been committed to lifting up women theatre artists in a collaborative storytelling process that focuses on human rights. We must do better in living up to that mission in a way that combats racism and amplifies the voices of BIPOC theatre artists.

We stand in solidarity with the Black community and recommit ourselves to providing a space for women of color to tell their stories. We also pledge to make sure our board looks more like the communities we serve. If we are to listen and learn and do better, we must make sure all voices are represented in our leadership. We are working on other concrete steps to take going forward in our efforts to end racial injustice.

AMERICAN HAPPINESS

BY JACQUELINE ALLEN TRIMBLE

It used to be in Mayberry
folks were never colored
–not even black and white–
but beige, khaki,
a little gray. In Mayberry
Deputy Barney had one bullet
and no need for rope.
The only burning he did was for his Thelma Lou.
The sheriff had no gun,
just an Aunt Bea baking pies
and an Opie full of freckles heading off to fish
or sing or court. Whatever Opies do.
In Mayberry, no doors were barred or locked.
The jail was mostly empty.
The only water hose we ever saw
lay peacefully
curled
on Sheriff Andy’s lawn.

Mayberry was a Southern town.
Technicolor must have killed it.
Made Andy a cranky lawyer.
Sent Opie running all the way to Hollywood.
But we remember.
Black and white,
from Chicago to Watts to Selma,
we tuned in to connect the dots of Opie’s face
while we dined on mashed potatoes and buttered corn
right before our TV sets,
mesmerized,
that in this Southern town,
the sheriff used his hose to water Aunt Bea’s roses.
We were so happy and relieved
we laughed until we could not think
until we fell off our sofas and wing-backs and can-bottoms;
we laughed until we could not see or hear
until we could forget
that outside our windows
other sheriffs with loaded guns, snarling dogs, and ready hoses
made quick work of a world on fire.

(reprinted from American Happiness: New Poems, New South Books)

Jacqueline Allen Trimble lives and writes in Montgomery, Alabama, where she is an associate professor of English and chairperson of Languages and Literatures at Alabama State University. Her work has appeared in various online and print publications including The Griot, The Offing, and The Blue Lake Review. She is currently a Cave Canem fellow and the recipient of a 2017 literary arts fellowship from the Alabama State Council on the Arts. She is also an Artistic Associate of Nora’s Playhouse.

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Only 4 more chances to see A DOLL’S HOUSE!

Posted by in Announcements

The reviews are out and A Doll’s House is a must see!

“…A Doll’s House premiered in 1879, the year Edison first ignited a light bulb, the year Einstein was born. If you think of all the ways the world has changed since that time, it’s amazing that a work of art could persist and remain so popular in our vastly different society. What could a play of this vintage teach us today? Plenty, as it turns out.”
Midtown Montgomery Living

“The risk Nora takes at the end of the play — a watershed moment on how women were portrayed on stage — shocked a patriarchal society who expected the stage to reinforce their standards. Fast forward to 2018 and the power of #MeToo and #TimesUp, and Nora’s heartbreakingly courageous decision reflects an understanding that sexual harassment comes in various guises and that there is still a lot to be done to galvanize gender equality.”
Theatre Montgomery

“‘It’s really the story of the unraveling of a marriage,’ said director Caroline Reddick Lawson. ‘It starts out with what seems to be a doll house perfect marriage. Two attractive young people married to each other. They have thee beautiful children. He’s just gotten a promotion to be a bank manager. Everything is happy. It’s Christmas Eve day. But then we start to see the cracks and the plot thickens. There’s everything from secrets that are revealed, blackmail, old friends who arise out of the blue.’”
Montgomery Advertiser

An interview with director Caroline Reddick Lawson:
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Announcing our 2018 Season!

Posted by in Announcements, Past Events, Productions

All of us here at Nora’s Playhouse are thrilled to announce that we will be bringing two great plays to the stage in 2018!  First up, in collaboration with Montgomery, Alabama’s Cloverdale Playhouse, it’s the proto-feminist classic from which Nora’s Playhouse got its name, Ibsen’s A Doll’s House.  Then, this summer in NYC, we’ll be debuting whatdoesfreemean?, the latest work by award-winning human rights playwright Catherine Filloux.  Keep scrolling for more details about both shows.

Cloverdale Playhouse, in collaboration with Nora’s Playhouse, presents

A Doll’s House

by Henrik Ibsen
a new version by Frank McGuinness
directed by Caroline Reddick Lawson

February 8 – 18, 2018

in Montgomery, AL
at The Elizabeth Crump Theatre,
Cloverdale Playhouse

Nora, vibrant housewife and mother of three, appears to enjoy living the life of a pampered, indulged child. Nonetheless, she suffers from a crippling dependency on her husband. Nora’s acceptance of the status quo is put under a microscope and the illusions behind her marriage are exposed. Henrik Ibsen’s classic work examines fundamental inequalities surrounding gender roles, power, independence and money. In a time in our society where women still fight for equality and a voice, this classic work illuminates that as women and as humans, our choices are rarely easy and often come at great cost, and makes us examine which choices are worth it.

Nora’s Playhouse, in association with John Jay College of Criminal Justice, presents

whatdoesfreemean?

a new play by Catherine Filloux
directed by Amy S. Green

July 13 – 28, 2018

in New York, NY
at The Black Box Theatre,
John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Mass incarceration is an acknowledged crisis in the United States. More than 205,000 women are incarcerated in America today. Most of them are mothers, and many of them are first-time offenders. But the statistics don’t capture the enormity of the impact mass incarceration has on women, and popular culture depictions of incarcerated women still tend toward the sensational and melodramatic. whatdoesfreemean?, by award-winning playwright Catherine Filloux, deconstructs female incarceration through a nonlinear drama about one woman’s harrowing experience, tracing its main character Mary’s labyrinthine odyssey from general population to segregated housing, to parole, as she tries keep her sanity in the face of loneliness, indifference, human cruelty, and loss.  This imaginative and poetic new piece moves the conversation past the statistics and stereotypes to examine the nature of freedom and solitude and what constitutes cruel and unusual punishment.
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