Nora's Playhouse

‘Earth is Cancelled’ Original Monologue Competition starts August 25!

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All of humanity has been upended amidst a global pandemic and mass protests. In the US, we are also facing great odds to secure fair and safe elections in November.

On this 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment, Nora’s Playhouse encourages you to protest with the power of art! We are calling on the women of Earth to:

1. Create and perform an original monologue characterizing an experience of life since COVID-19. This can be from personal experience or imagined through someone else’s eyes.

2. Record a performance of your monologue (no more than 5 minutes long), and

3. Submit directly to our official Earth is Cancelled Facebook event by Monday, September 7 at 11:59 EDT to be considered in one of our two prize categories: Fan Favorite and Critics’ Pick. (The event will go live on the morning of Tuesday, August 25… stay tuned for the link.)

We encourage you to get to work on your piece now! Our Fan Favorite will be decided by the monologue with the most likes. The sooner you post your submission once the event goes live, the better your chances of winning! We want your magnificent work to get maximum exposure!

Our Executive Board at Nora’s will vote to decide which submission is the Critics’ Pick.

The two winners will be announced on Thursday, September 10. The winning monologues will be re-posted to Nora’s Facebook page and each winner will receive a $50 cash prize. Nora’s Playhouse will also make a $50 donation in each winner’s name to Equal Justice Initiative.

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The Nora Salon on Zoom: “Cowboys Are Waiting For Me in Montana” on June 24th!

Posted by in Nora Salon

We can’t yet gather in person for any theatre, so we are turning our postponed salon reading of Leah Kornfield Friedman’s Cowboys Are Waiting For Me In Montana (originally scheduled for3/20) into a virtual gathering happening Wednesday, June 24th! We hope you will join us online for an informal reading and some friendly conversation on ZOOM!

It’s the 4th of July. It is also the 45th wedding anniversary of Bride and Groom. When Groom comes home to reveal that he has been fired, Bride panics. But the couple decides to uphold their annual tradition anyway and journey through “The Notebook.” This detailed record of milestones and the wild range of emotions that has accompanied their decades long marriage, reveals Bride’s frustrations with her role as a wife and mother and her unquenchable thirst for change, adventure, and escape. Witness the “flotsam and jetsam” of Bride and Groom’s lives in Leah Kornfeld Friedman’s Beckett-esque one act, Cowboys Are Waiting For Me in Montana.

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The Nora Salon:
Cowboys Are Waiting For Me in Montana

Wednesday, June 24th at 7pm (EDT) on ZOOM

Please email reservations@norasplayhouse.org to add your name to the guest list and receive the Zoom link for this online reading.

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BLACK LIVES MATTER

Posted by in Announcements

Since Nora’s Playhouse’s founding in 2009, we have been committed to lifting up women theatre artists in a collaborative storytelling process that focuses on human rights. We must do better in living up to that mission in a way that combats racism and amplifies the voices of BIPOC theatre artists.

We stand in solidarity with the Black community and recommit ourselves to providing a space for women of color to tell their stories. We also pledge to make sure our board looks more like the communities we serve. If we are to listen and learn and do better, we must make sure all voices are represented in our leadership. We are working on other concrete steps to take going forward in our efforts to end racial injustice.

AMERICAN HAPPINESS

BY JACQUELINE ALLEN TRIMBLE

It used to be in Mayberry
folks were never colored
–not even black and white–
but beige, khaki,
a little gray. In Mayberry
Deputy Barney had one bullet
and no need for rope.
The only burning he did was for his Thelma Lou.
The sheriff had no gun,
just an Aunt Bea baking pies
and an Opie full of freckles heading off to fish
or sing or court. Whatever Opies do.
In Mayberry, no doors were barred or locked.
The jail was mostly empty.
The only water hose we ever saw
lay peacefully
curled
on Sheriff Andy’s lawn.

Mayberry was a Southern town.
Technicolor must have killed it.
Made Andy a cranky lawyer.
Sent Opie running all the way to Hollywood.
But we remember.
Black and white,
from Chicago to Watts to Selma,
we tuned in to connect the dots of Opie’s face
while we dined on mashed potatoes and buttered corn
right before our TV sets,
mesmerized,
that in this Southern town,
the sheriff used his hose to water Aunt Bea’s roses.
We were so happy and relieved
we laughed until we could not think
until we fell off our sofas and wing-backs and can-bottoms;
we laughed until we could not see or hear
until we could forget
that outside our windows
other sheriffs with loaded guns, snarling dogs, and ready hoses
made quick work of a world on fire.

(reprinted from American Happiness: New Poems, New South Books)

Jacqueline Allen Trimble lives and writes in Montgomery, Alabama, where she is an associate professor of English and chairperson of Languages and Literatures at Alabama State University. Her work has appeared in various online and print publications including The Griot, The Offing, and The Blue Lake Review. She is currently a Cave Canem fellow and the recipient of a 2017 literary arts fellowship from the Alabama State Council on the Arts. She is also an Artistic Associate of Nora’s Playhouse.

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